This trail is a great way to explore the Wray Valley, following in the footsteps of the Victorians who built the Newton Abbot to Moretonhampstead railway in 1866.

The 11km, mainly traffic free, route links Bovey Tracey to Moretonhampstead. It follows the line of the old railway, which was closed to passengers in 1959, taking you through the National Trust Parke Estate and past the picturesque villlage of Lustleigh.

The trail has been several years in the making and has involved major works including 2 new bridges across the A382. Devon County Council has worked with local landowners and Dartmoor National Park to ensure the trail will benefit everyone.

https://www.dartmoor.gov.uk/wildlife-and-heritage/dartmoor-story/dartmoor-story-pages/places/wray-valley 

This newly constructed cycle trail offers an almost entirely traffic-free, wonderfully level route which forms part of the South Coast NCN No.2.

The trail takes you right around the Exe Estuary from Dawlish to Exmouth, passing through the pretty villages of Starcross, Topsham and Lympstone to name a few.  The estuary is of international importance for wintering waders and wildfowl, supporting 1000’s of birds.  RSPB reserves near Topsham and Dawlish Warren National Nature Reserve offer some of the best opportunities to view wildlife along the estuary. 

https://www.exploredevon.info/activities/cycle/exe-estuary-trail/

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/Exe-Estuary-Cycle-Trail/263647563753852 (153)

Keep healthy in Exeter by using walking and cycling. Get buses to find new walks when it is safe to do so. Exeter is full of relaxing or energetic walks.

  • Stroll by the River Exe and the Exeter Ship Canal
  • Train for a marathon by walking or running the Exeter Cosy Routes
  • Visit the green lungs of Exeter by walking Exeter's Green Circle
  • Look for wildlife on the River Exe Wild Walk
  • Go farther by cycling the Exe Estuary Trail or walking the Exe Valley Way and the Devonshire Heartland Way

Use this site to plan your walks, look at the Covid19 data on the Devon Dashboard, listen to the science and exercise your personal responsibility as well as our body and mind.

Exeter Strategic Cycle Route E2 connects Exminster at Broadclyst through almost completely traffic-free routes.

In line with the priorities outlined in the Council’s Cycling and Multi-Use Trail Network Strategy, a network of proposed cycle routes was put forward in 2015. For the Exeter strategic cycle routes, it was agreed that the cycle routes E3 and E4 and E9 were seen as key primary cycle routes as they connect areas of growth and development east of the city with schools, hospital, local centres, University and the city centre.

https://www.devon.gov.uk/e4/ 

The Boniface Trail is a planned shared-use path between Crediton and Exeter. It is designed to be a safe route for walkers, runners, cyclists and wheelchair users. It will also link communities en-route such as Dunscombe, Smallbrook, Newton St Cyres, Langford, Half Moon and Cowley.

http://bonifacetrail.org/

Social Media:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/697244666969370/ (130)

Exeter Strategic Cycle Route E4 aims to connect University of Exeter, Stratham to Redhayes Bridge, Monkerton through almost completely traffic-free routes. At present this 5km (3 mile) route is almost 80% traffic-free.

In line with the priorities outlined in the Council’s Cycling and Multi-Use Trail Network Strategy, a network of proposed cycle routes was put forward in 2015. For the Exeter strategic cycle routes, it was agreed that the cycle routes E3 and E4 and E9 were seen as key primary cycle routes as they connect areas of growth and development east of the city with schools, hospital, local centres, University and the city centre.

https://www.devon.gov.uk/e4/ 

In line with the priorities outlined in the Council’s Cycling and Multi-Use Trail Network Strategy, a network of proposed cycle routes was put forward in 2015. For the Exeter strategic cycle routes, it was agreed that the cycle routes E3 and E4 and E9 were seen as key primary cycle routes as they connect areas of growth and development east of the city with schools, hospital, local centres, University and the city centre.

The first of the strategic routes being developed in Exeter is the E4 route. Work started in 2017 on this 5km route which links the Redhayes Bridge to the University and the city centre.

The design of this route is ambitious and provides a step change in the quality of walking and cycling infrastructure across the city. The route will segregate pedestrians, cyclists and vehicular traffic where possible.

https://www.devon.gov.uk/e4/ 

Exeter Strategic Cycle Route E9 aims to connect Exeter City Centre to Newcourt through almost completely traffic-free routes. At present very little of this 5.75km (3.5 mile) route is traffic-free.

In line with the priorities outlined in the Council’s Cycling and Multi-Use Trail Network Strategy, a network of proposed cycle routes was put forward in 2015. For the Exeter strategic cycle routes, it was agreed that the cycle routes E3 and E4 and E9 were seen as key primary cycle routes as they connect areas of growth and development east of the city with schools, hospital, local centres, University and the city centre.

https://www.devon.gov.uk/e4/ 

Exeter Strategic Cycle Route E3 aims to connect Exeter City Centre to Cranbrook through almost completely traffic-free routes. At present this 10km (6 mile) route is just over 50% traffic-free.

In line with the priorities outlined in the Council’s Cycling and Multi-Use Trail Network Strategy, a network of proposed cycle routes was put forward in 2015. For the Exeter strategic cycle routes, it was agreed that the cycle routes E3 and E4 and E9 were seen as key primary cycle routes as they connect areas of growth and development east of the city with schools, hospital, local centres, University and the city centre.

https://www.devon.gov.uk/e4/ 

This is a short route connecting Exeter St David's train station to National Route 2 by following the River Exe and part of the Exeter Canal towpath.

Starting from Exeter St David’s station the route crosses the River Exe via a bridge on Station Road and then turns south to follow paths alongside the River Exe and then Exeter Canal. The route travels through the Riverside Valley Park and links with National Route 2 at Bridge Road. National Route 2 continues on the Exeter Canal all the way to Exminster.

There is the opportunity to take the ferry across the river to Topsham and continue back to Exeter on the opposite side of the river.

https://www.sustrans.org.uk/find-a-route-on-the-national-cycle-network/route-34/ 

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